Inspiration, Necklaces, Uncategorized

The Inspiration behind the new Dark goddess Mala necklace

The Dark Goddess Mala is inspired by the Hindu deity Kali and aims to bring to its wearer:

  • Clarity
  • Protection
  • Objectivity
  • Courage
  • Order

“It takes courage to grow up and become who you really are.” ~ e.e. cummings

Kali, whose name comes from the word ‘time’ in Sanskrit, cleanses the old and make way for the new. She brings death of the ego and of the blinding self-centered view of reality. She empowers us to reach our full potential.

Kali is described as carrying a sword of knowledge with which she slices through delusions and frees us from any limitations. She has a necklace made out of heads which symbolizes the ego and a skirt made of human arms. Kali is often portrayed as black or dark blue in color. She has four arms. Her eyes are red, filled with rage. She has fangs and a split tongue.

Illustration by Junior Beckley

Despite of her terrible form, Kali is often considered the kindest and is also seen as a great protector against evil and negative energy. Kali provides clarity and insight which help us to firmly make decisions, to let go of fantasy, and to move toward the truth.

Affirmation/ Mantra

“I let go of worries or emotions that drain me.”

Let go of worries and emotions which clog up your mind and fog your heart. Release all negative emotions and be open to love and goodness. Don’t allow the ego to get attached to negative thoughts or feelings.

“My heart is open and my mind is clear.”

Remind yourself to let go of any negativity. Let go of judgement. Open your heart and see the goodness in the world and you will free your mind to be clear and focused.

Thank you for reading and hopefully this article reveals a little bit of the process and inspiration behind making this necklace. Check out the Dark Goddess Mala available now in our Etsy shop!

Inspiration, News

A Day at the Museum

Today we spent a very inspiring day at the museum visiting the Met’s Cosmic Buddhas in the Himalayas. It is a celebration of the tantric pantheon of Buddhist gods and goddesses, all depicted in beautiful colors and forms. These peaceful compositions with their vivid palette were profoundly inspirational and meditative.

Tantric Buddhism started as a movement in eastern India and is characterized by the usage of mantras and yoga to evoke experiences that enable the realization of enlightenment.

The simple message of inner peace is responsible for the appeal of the Buddhist art and what keeps on inspiring us in the creation of our jewelry.

Inspiration

About beads and malas

Meditation, quiet reflection, prayer…Beads are present in all of these moments of deep introspection and are used in various religious traditions all around the world. Catholics have rosary, Muslims have tasbih, Buddhists and Hindus use japa mala. They all have a different number of beads and different names but what they all have in common is that they assist in reciting and counting specific prayers or incantations. They help achieve a state of calm, create a place of peace, and get in touch with spirituality.

In recent years, prayer beads have become quite the fashion accessory. Yoga practice has increased the popularity of beaded necklaces and bracelets, especially of malas.

Malas are traditionally made of 108 gemstone beads plus a guru bead. There are many theories behind the significance of the number 108. Some believe that the number 1 stands for the universe and highest truth, 0 symbolizes emptiness and humility in spiritual practice, and 8 represents infinity and timelessness. The addition of the number’s digits (1+0+8) also equals 9, a number with great significance and meaning. It stands for eternity, faith, spiritual enlightenment and awakening.

In the Hindu tradition malas are made of 32 to 108 rudraksha beads, carved from the seeds of a tree unique to the island of Java in Indonesia. These rough seeds represent the difficult and rigid life required of the worshippers of Siva. Buddhist mala also typically consist of strands of 108 beads, reflecting the religion’s historical connection to Hinduism. In Buddhism, the 108 beads represent the impurities that one overcomes in the path to Nirvana. Buddhist prayer beads have traditionally been made from the wood or seeds of the sacred Bodhi tree. Bodhi in sanskrit translates to “enlightened” and reflects Buddha’s understanding of the true nature of things.

Hope, this was helpful.

Research and info thanks to Museum of Anthropology